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Clean water and soap

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Water, sanitation and hygiene—referred to as WASH by the humanitarian sector. Due to their interdependent nature, these three core issues are grouped together. At iACT, these issues, and more, are a core part of all our curriculums across our education and sports programs. However, we refer to our curriculum as Health, Hygiene and Wellness.

Yesterday, during Little Ripples teacher training in camp Djabal, eastern Chad, our Program Manager, Felicia Lee, covered the three most important aspects of our Health, Hygiene and Wellness curriculum—what we call the low hanging fruit with the greatest potential for impact on the health of a child, a classroom and the community. They are:

  1. Using the latrine and ending the practice of open defecation

  2. Washing hands with clean water and soap, after using the latrine and before and after eating meals

  3. Coughing and sneezing into the arm

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