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For Refugees from CAR, Life Doesn’t Stop

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Last week, Stanislas, Ghislaine, Haron, and Rachidatou, the four Refugees United Soccer Academy coaches in refugee camp Gado in eastern Cameroon, traveled by bus to meet Kelsey and me in Bertoua, a town five hours south of Gado. The logistics weren’t easy, but it had been two years since we had last seen the coaches, and meeting in Bertoua allowed us to spend a day together.

“Life is hard,” they shared, as we sat waiting for our food in a quiet restaurant. Food rations have been reduced and there are very few job opportunities. Families are struggling to survive and a generation of youth, so capable and eager to rebuild their lives, is losing hope. As a result, the coaches tell us, some families have made the very dangerous decision to go back to Central African Republic (CAR), a country some say