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Coaches and Teachers

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A week ago, I never would have believed that watermelons grew in eastern Chad. I saw the plants’ vines tangled in the sand as we drove from Guererda to Iridimi today. The fruit is sold everywhere—from the markets in the villages to the little restaurants in the refugee camps, and atone-person roadside stands. I chuckle at the irony that a fruit composed of mostly water appears to thrive in this unforgiving terrain with sandy earth, dry air, hot temperatures, and little precipitation.