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Returning to Camps Kounoungou and Mile, Chad

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I write sitting on the ledge of my hotel room patio. It’s not comfortable, but my intention is to get acclimated to the 110-degree heat before we travel to eastern Chad tomorrow and we begin our long days in refugee camps Kounoungou and Mile. Not too many years ago this hotel was the place to be in N’djamena, buzzing with expats, humanitarian workers, andmilitary and government officials. For many reasons, including a loss of attention on the refugee crisis in Chad, lizards and birds now dominate the property. It’s just as quiet as the UN Refugee Agency compound where we’ll be staying tomorrow night in Guereda, eastern Chad.<