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The Power of Play

We at iACT talk a lot about the importance of play for children, but we know play can be just as valuable for adults.


iACT infuses all of our trainings - both for coaches and teachers - with play. If you walk into an iACT training session, you are bound to hear lots of laughter as you see full-grown adults running in circles in a game of Snake Tag or Duck, Duck, Goose, faces alight with joy.


A group of teachers in a semi-circle outside ready to play a game with one in front holding a ball.
Little Ripples teacher trainees in camp Iridimi, eastern Chad, learn about outdoor play with iACT Board Member and Little Ripples Adviser Merri Weir.

During our most recent trip to Chad, many of the trainees in the Little Ripples Teacher Training I session started out the first day a bit shy and timid. But as we began to introduce the theory of learning through play, there was almost an immediate shift. Once we started playing interactive games, everyone let their guard down and laughed together, and it ultimately led to lots of engagement from the group for the rest of the training.


Playing together isn't just good fun, it also serves as preparation for the work the trainees will do in their classrooms. The games we teach are examples of games teachers can use with their students. We walk teachers through the difference between free play (playing without instructions) and guided play (playing with instructions). Teachers learn how each type of play can happen in each class, as well as strategies for how each can be done both indoors and outdoors.


FREE PLAY

Teachers sitting on the ground in circles using toys to practice different types of play.
Teacher trainees practicing free play during Little Ripples Teachers Training I in camp Kouchagine-Moura, eastern Chad.

Teachers sitting on the ground in a circle using blocks to build an item.
Teacher trainees practicing guided play during Little Ripples Teachers Training I in camp Iridimi, eastern Chad.

GUIDED PLAY


Two teachers, one holding a blue ball, standing in front of a group ready to teach them a game.
iACT’s Little Ripples refugee team members Zenab and Amani getting ready to demonstrate Red Light, Green Light (or "Stop, Go!" as we called it in training) for teacher trainees in camp Iridimi, eastern Chad.

A group of teachers in a line ready to play a game!
iACT Global Programs Manager Felicia Lee getting ready to show teacher trainees how to play Red Light, Green Light (or Stop, Go!) in camp Kouchagine-Moura, eastern Chad.

Two women run for a ball in a game of Steal the Ball.
Teacher trainees learning how to play Steal the Ball in camp Iridimi, eastern Chad.

Two women chase each other around the circle in a game of Duck, Duck, Goose
Teacher trainees learning how to play Duck, Duck, Goose (or Goat, Goat, Donkey) in camp Iridimi, eastern Chad.
Donate now to support the incredible teachers of Little Ripples as they continue to provide play-based learning to refugee children.







Help iACT continue to do what it does best:

Support refugees in the forgotten corners of the world through soccer and preschool.

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